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post-title The impressive lighthouse of Lefkatas in the southern part of Lefkas (drone video)

The impressive lighthouse of Lefkatas in the southern part of Lefkas (drone video)

The impressive lighthouse of Lefkatas in the southern part of Lefkas (drone video)

The impressive lighthouse of Lefkatas in the southern part of Lefkas (drone video)

The lightouse of Lefkas is built in 1890. The height of its tower is 14 meters and its focal height is 70 meters.

During the Second World War it is remained off. In 1945, as part of the reorganization of the Pharic Network, the lighthouse reopened as a supervisor. In 1950 the lighthouse was destroyed by an earthquake and temporarily operated an automatic torch of acetyl until 1956, when repair work was completed. In 1985 the lighthouse was electrified and operated as a watchman.

The cape at the southern edge of the island is associated with legends and mysteries that travel the visitors thousands of years into the past. In 1905, W. Dörpfeld found a shrine of Apollo or, according to another theory, a place of sacrifice just a few metres to the southeast of the lighthouse. Today, there are only some remnants of the altar that are still visible.

The shrine and the rocks of the cape were connected with the cleansing power that was attributed to Apollo. A tradition reports that every year a convict was thrown off the cliffs in order to ritually cleanse the island and prevent any punishment from the gods. We do not really know when it was built. A legend states that it was founded by Lefkos from Zakynthos, a comrade of Odysseus. The name of the cape may have derived from him. If that was the case, then it must have been built just before the beginning of the Trojan War. Nevertheless, it is more likely that it was built in the 7th century BC by the Corinthians, according to an inscription that was found in 1753.

There is also the legend that the ones who were abandoned or disappointed by their lovers committed suicide by falling off the rock, just like Sappho, the poetess of love from Lesbos, who jumped off the cliffs because of her love for Phaon. It was due to her that the cape is also known as “Lady’s Cape” or “Lady’s Jump”.

Even if this specific site was of no archaeological value, it would still be worth visiting. The impressive steep rocks that dive into the water, the endless blue of the Ionian Sea on one side and the green-clad island on the other, the lighthouse and the absolute calmness will make your visit simply unforgettable.

Watch the impresive drone video of Kosmito MG

About Χρυσούλα Σκλαβενίτη

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